COLORFUL BUILDINGS: 10 MUST-SEE RED-COLORED ARCHITECTURE

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture 1.001

Colors play a very important role in our world. Many studies have been done about the psychology of colors and the meaning behind them. It is very difficult to see the natural world and man-made world (buildings, products, etc.) without colors. One thing is for sure that color is irreplaceable because we use it as a powerful form of communication. Designers all over the world have realized the powerful reactions of colors and have used it for products, logos, web sites, and even architecture. For the new Colorful Buildings series, Dzzyn has gathered stimulating buildings that have the color, red, in common.

A branch of science called color psychology has found that red can have a profound influence on our mood, perceptions and actions. Red is the most dynamic and passionate color symbolizing love, rage and courage. Demanding attention, red has a great emotional impact. It is the color associated with energy and aggression. Red has an effect on our physiological state, since it increases heart rate and makes us breathe faster. Red is a dominant color and has been found that athletes wearing a red kit in combat sports had a bigger chance of winning than those who wore a blue kit. Considering that it draws attention, it’s easy to see why it’s so often used in warning signs indicating danger. Shades of scarlet are also linked to sexuality and desire. People wearing red are consistently rated as more attractive by others. In general, red has both positive and negative connotations. The positive aspects are that it represents love, activity, energy, attention and power. The negative aspects refer to aggression, dominance that instills fear, danger and stress. Some of the examples below have used the color red in their buildings to compliment the green scenery surrounding these structures. Designers use these shades of ruby, crimson, and scarlet to invoke the emotions and responses mentioned above. In no particular order, let’s look at 10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture.

:: 1 :: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2010 | Architects:  Jean Nouvel | Location: Kensington Gardens, London, UK | Project Year: 2010 | Photographs: Phillipe Ruault

Nouvel’s bright red pavilion contrasts the park’s greenery, immediately drawing the eye. The color reflects the iconic British images of traditional telephone boxes, post boxes and London buses. Striking glass, polycarbonate and fabric structures create a versatile system of interior and exterior spaces. Around the Pavilion, Nouvel has created spaces for outdoor enjoyment and play, bringing the tradition of French civic parks to London.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Serpentine Gallery Pavilion

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Serpentine Pavilion

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2010

 

 

:: 2 :: Parish Church of Santa Monica | Architects: Vicens & Ramos | Location: Rivas-Vaciamadrid, Madrid, Spain | Project Year: 2009 | Photographs: Vicens & Ramos

Several windows splay from one end of this weathering steel church, designed by Vicens + Ramos as the centrepiece for a growing residential community near Madrid. The architects aimed to create a light-filled building, “appropriate for the subject of holiness”. It is clad externally with pre-rusted steel, often known by the brand name Corten, which gives the building a rich red-orange tone.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Parish Church of Santa Monica 1

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Parish Church of Santa Monica interior

 

:: 3 :: House of the Arts | Architects: Future Architecture Thinking | Location: 3220 Miranda do Corvo, Portugal | Project Year: 2013 | Photographs: João Morgado

From the architect: “The building features a contemporary and volumetrically expressive language. The sloping roofs establish a dialogue with the geometry of the mountain landscape, in an analogy to the village rooftops. The dynamism achieved through the continuity between façades and roof is accented by a strong red colour, emphasizing its design and highlighting the building through the surrounding landscaped area vegetation. More than a building, the Casa das Artes pretends to be an iconic landmark, celebrating the place where people meet, where culture and art happens, a space capable of promoting and stimulating creative activity, increasing the population quality of life.”

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - House of the Arts 4

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - House of the Arts 3

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - House of the Arts

 

:: 4 :: Petersen Automotive Museum | Architects: Kohn Pedersen Fox | Location: Los Angeles, California| Project Year: 2015 | Photographs: KPF

From the architect: Inspired by the form of a car, KPF’s design creates a new “body” around the existing “chassis” of the museum. The rooftop is converted into a party space that can be rented out. A corrugated aluminium rain screen outboard wraps the building, while “ribbons” of angel hair stainless steel and red painted aluminium flow around the building, manoeuvring the existing entry vestibule and other apertures. Sitting atop the existing structural system like the body of a car mounted to its frame, the steel “ribbons” evoke a sense of speed and movement and are brushed to avoid creation of glare.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Petersen Automotive Museum KPF

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Petersen Automotive Museum 2

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Petersen Automotive Museum

 

:: 5 :: Espace Culturel de La Hague | Architects: Peripheriques Architectes + Marin + Trotti Architects | Location: 50440 Beaumont-Hague, France | Project Year: 2015 | Photographs: Sergio Grazia

Triangular facets of perforated red metal frame the entrance to this cultural center. According to Périphériques directors Emmanuelle Marin and David Trottin, the aim was to reinterpret the forms of the surrounding landscape, which include hidden roads, dense hedge thickets and rolling topography. “Volumes receives sculptural feature due to the colourful anodised metal panels, ” said Marin and Trottin. The rest of the building’s exterior is made up of both mirrored panels and windows, intended to reflect both the surrounding greenery and the sky while complimenting the red metal panels.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Espace Cultural de La Hague

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Espace Cultural de La Hague 2

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Espace Cultural de La Hague interior

:: 6 :: Nestlé Chocolate Museum | Architects: Rojkind Arquitectos | Location: Toluca de Lerdo, Mexico | Project Year: 2007

From the architect: An architectural experience. sensorial architecture, from the surprises, the twists and folds. An architectural challenge. As much the forms and the spaces they contain, like the times are taken to the limit. Foldings and record time: 2.5 months to finish….and that included design and construction!

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Nestle Chocolate Museum Mexico 1

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Nestle Chocolate Museum Mexico

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Nestle Chocolate Museum Mexico interior

 

:: 7 :: Nestlé’s Chocolate Museum | Architects:  Metro Arquitetos Associados | Location: São Paulo, Brazil | Project Year: 2011 | Photographs: Leonardo Finotti

Brazilian architects Metro have completed a red glass chocolate museum in the sky. The elevated Nestlé Chocolate Museum bridges roads and wraps around buildings at the existing chocolate factory in Brazil. Located beside a highway between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, the bright red Nestlé Chocolate Museum is visible to passing traffic.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Nestle Chocolate Museum Brazil 10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Nestle Chocolate Museum Brazil 1

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Nestle Chocolate Museum Brazil 2

 

:: 8 :: Design Museum Holon | Architects: Ron Arad Architects | Location: Holon, Israel | Project Year: 2010 | Photographs: RAAL, Yael Pincus, Marzorati Ronchetti

From the architect: The greater part of the museum’s external appearance is shrouded by five dominant bands of Corten steel structure which undulate and meander their way in, out and around the museum’s internal volumes. At times in unison, or apart, enclosing space, or notionally defining it. The bands act as a spine for the building – both supporting large parts of it structurally and dictating its posture in relation to its surroundings. The topographic horizontality of the bands is further emphasised by a gradation of treated patinas and the subsequent weathering of the steel over the lifetime of the building, both of which echo the familiar geological striations of the Israeli desert. The bands are never entirely obscured from the visitor’s sight, and act as a visual key to one’s position within the museum.

 

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Design Museum Holon 3

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Design Museum Holon 1

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Design Museum Holon 2

 

:: 9 :: 10Cal Tower | Architects:  Supermachine Studio| Location: Chang Wat Chon Buri 20130, Thailand | Project Year: 2014 | Photographs: Wison Tungthunya

From the architect: Our proposal for a community playground is a stacking concrete labyrinth that offers many possibilities for children and adults to climb around. The structure offers some tens combinations of routes for families to redefine their relationships. Playing hide and seek in the labyrinth is, for us, an activity that allow parents to spend more time with their kids. The tower is name after the energy one will use to travel up the structure. Walking with normal speed from bottom to top of the tower will consume 10 Calories. The tower also allows existing and new plantation to penetrate to its voids. Through time it will be camouflage into crowns of trees letting people travel up and down to explore their relationships with green.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - 10Cal Tower

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - 10Cal Tower 2

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - 10Cal Tower 4

 

:: 10 :: Sliding House | Architects:  dRMM | Location: Suffolk, England | Project Year: 2009

This operable house features a sliding structure that fits over the static main house, guest annexe and greenhouse. The mobile element, which is 28 metres long and weighs 50 tons, move along rails set into the ground. As it moves, the sliding element creates shifting outdoor living areas between the static elements as well as altering views, lighting conditions and the sense of enclosure inside the house. The 3 fixed buildings are further defined with distinct finishes; red rubber membrane and glass, red and black stained larch respectively.

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Sliding House

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Sliding House 1

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Sliding House 3

10 Must-See Red-Colored Architecture - Sliding House Diagram

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